with

Mike Bellah

Make contacts now with other people outside your job but inside your profession. One day who you know may be just as important as what you know.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Your savings may allow you to go back to school with only a part-time job. Don't be afraid of the temporary struggle. A fulfilling new career is worth the sacrifice.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Your training and enthusiasm can convince a smart investor to give you a chance.
 

Career Changes

Middle-aged men are twice as likely to lose their jobs in a permanent layoff as they were 13 years ago," says a report headed by Harvard economist James Medoff and published by the National Study Center.

"About one million men a year suffer this devastating midlife job crisis at a time when their financial and family responsibilities are greatest," adds Joseph Cooper of the National Study Center. "Millions more face the threat."

And the threat applies equally to women. Not only does corporate downsizing and shifting technology affect women workers too, but wives of the recently unemployed may have to begin or change jobs themselves in order to make up the economic shortfall.

And there are other reasons for finding new jobs at midlife. Divorce, the empty nest, and a change in interest or ability can each put someone back in the job market. 

So how do you find a new job at midlife? What if you must change not only jobs but careers? Writing from personal experience (my own career change began four years ago), I have some suggestions.

Prepare now

In addition to long-term savings, plan now to build a cash reserve equal to about six months' salary. This will take some sacrifice but will give you more options if you are laid off. Also, train now to increase your marketability. New skills will make you both more secure in your present job and more likely to land a future one. Finally, make contacts now with other people outside your job but inside your profession. One day who you know may be just as important as what you know.

Broadly define yourself

Broadly define both your job skills and interests. If you build houses, could you also remodel them? How about building furniture or craft items? Your new career may use old skills in a new way. And what about your avocations? Do you do something as a hobby that could become a job?

Add training

Even after you have been laid off, formal training is still an option. Your savings may allow you to go back to school with only a part-time job. Don't be afraid of the temporary struggle. A fulfilling new career is worth the sacrifice (Just be sure to check first with the institution's counseling center to make sure your field has plenty of jobs available).

Market yourself

Be confident and be creative. What do you have that others need? How could you make an already successful business more successful? Is there a market need that no one is addressing? Your training and enthusiasm can convince a smart investor to give you a chance.

Modify expectations

Be willing to modify expectations as you begin a new career. Things need not turn out exactly as planned to be successful. Give your new job a chance. Put up with the things you do not like in order to enjoy those you do, and be hopeful; many of us are finding new midlife careers the most fulfilling yet.

Find the perfect position for you! Job is job has everything from finance jobs to your next career change.
 

Life coach Sheryl Bullock can help you make your middle years your best years. Contact my friend Sheryl for a free initial consultation. 

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